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What to do when the other driver’s insurance agency calls you

| Feb 5, 2019 | Auto Accidents |

Traffic collisions are rarely easy to figure out. This is especially true when more than two vehicles are in play, such as what happened on I-70 on Jan. 25. Police investigated the incident and found the cause was most likely a construction crew repairing potholes on the scene.

It is vital to file a police report and see a doctor immediately after a car accident. You also want to get in touch with your auto insurance company within 24 hours of the incident. You want to stick to the facts during this conversation. You do not want to give your provider any excuse to deny your coverage. While you recover, you may also receive a phone call from the other driver’s insurance agency. You need to be extremely careful about how you proceed.

It is best to not say anything

You need to remember that the other driver’s insurance agent is not your friend. The representative wants to find any reason to limit how much money the company has to pay out. Anything you say can and will go against you, so it is best to inform the caller that you do not wish to speak to the agency without an attorney present. You can even direct the representative to your lawyer’s office so that your legal representation can assist you.

You do not want to guess on anything

Even statements that seem innocuous can help the other party’s insurance company. For example, you may still be at the doctor’s office when the insurance agent contacts you. You may say something such as “I feel fine,” and the insurance company can use that statement to suggest your injuries were not that bad. You need to be extremely careful, especially if you may have broken bones or need to miss work for at least two days. You need to give a statement to your own insurance and no one else.

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